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Homage to D.V.

Posted by Laura
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Homage to D.V. as interpreted by Steven Meisel. Diana Vreeland. Maestra of style in Vogue USA in the 1960s, who inspired a new elegance made of personality and glamour, and launched an image that is still current today.

 

 

Though Diana Vreeland was only editor-in-chief of American Vogue for 8 years from 1963 to 1971 (a mere blip compared to Edna Woolman Chase's 38 years, Anna Wintour's 28 and Grace Mirabella's 17), in many ways she has become the most influential - at least stylistically. The issues under her directorship have a clear aesthetic vision and are unmistakably her own - probably arising from her totally fearlessness and distinct sense of self that was translated into every aspect of her life.

A year following her death, a powerhouse group of fashion insiders created this homage to Vreeland's Vogue looks. While Diana had a long history within the fashion industry prior to her years at Vogue, this editorial most specifically looks at the years 1965-67. In 1965, she coined the term "Youthquake", giving her blessing to subcultural youth culture, music and fashion by featuring it on the pages of Vogue. The stories from these years are brash and vibrant yet balanced with an opulence and glamour that was innate to her. Therefore it is probably unsurprising that this brief period held such a sway on the young vanguard of high fashion in 1990: former Parsons-classmates Steven Meisel and Anna Sui, model Linda Evangelista, hairdresser Garren and makeup artist François Nars. The hair, makeup, styling and poses are what creates the illusion of 60s glamour, as the clothes themselves bear little relation to the actual silhouettes of the period. The end result? A witty paean to Vreeland, couched in the hard luxury of the late 1980s.

 

Linda Evangelista photographed by Steven Meisel and styled by Anna Sui for Vogue Italia, December 1990.

 

 

(L) Dress with contrast profile, Carolyne Roehm; Hat, shuichi Kameoka; earrings, Kenneth Jay Lane; Lacrasia gloves; openwork tights, Franco Bombana; boots, Maud Frizon.  (R) Lace Dress, Scaasi; scarves, Shinichi Kameoka; Shalimar gloves; bag, Jill Stuart; Fogal tights; Manolo Blahnik shoes.

 

 

(L) Between eccentricity and glamour, portraits of Diana Vreeland.  (R) Coat, Scaasi for Mohl Furs; hat, James Coviello; jewelry, Deanna Hamro; Lacrasia gloves.

 

 

(L) Short dress with stitching and lace petticoat, Geoffrey Beene; jewelry by Melina Crosostom, Wendy Gell and Kenneth Jay Lane; tights, Filodoro; shoe, Charles Kammer.  (R) Fantasy dress, Geoffrey Beene; Bijoux, Wendy Gell; Shalimar gloves; bag, Jill Stuart; Hue socks; Robert Clergerie shoes.

 

 

(L) Silk blazer, Atelier Versace. Jewelry by Kenneth Jay Lane, Madeline Beth and Deanna Hamro; tights, Filodoro; Manolo Blahnik shoes.  (R) Harlequin leggings, Anna Molinari for Blumarine; top, Carolyne Roehm; Mongolian lamb coat, Adrienne Landau; hat, Shuichi Kameoka; Cutler & Gross sunglasses; jewelry, Wendy Gell; Sergio Rossi boots.

 

 

(L) Embroidered dress, Carolyne Roehm; Eric Beamon earrings.  (R) Signed Avedon and Penn images of stars, aristocrats and top models in Vogue USA directed by Diana Vreeland, 1965-67.

 

 

(L) Coat with windowpane check, Scaasi for Mohl Furs; cashmeresweater,  Agnona; jewelry by Deanna Hamro and Kenneth Jay Lane; Lacrasia gloves; boots, Patrick Cox.  (R) Coat and dress, Oscar de la Renta; Kenneth Jay Lane jewelry; tights, Filodoro.

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