X
X

PROCEED TO CHECKOUT

Vintage Shopping with Vogue

Posted by Cherie
Tweet It | Facebook It | Pin It

If there is anything I like more then acquiring and selling vintage it's seeing how other people are wearing it and hearing their thoughts on vintage. So when I stumbled across this series from Vogue I was instantly enamored.

At first I thought it was a one-off and then I realized that it's been an ongoing series and so far has featured Arden Wohl, Langley Fox Hemingway, Marina Muñoz, Laeticia Harrison-Roberts, aka Misfit Dior, Tennessee Thomas and Vanessa Seward. It is a fabulous read and we have reprinted all their thoughts and responses below exactly as they appeared on Vogue.com. Enjoy!

 

 

 

Arden Wohl Shares Tips from NYC

There’s no shortage of well-dressed women in the world, but the ones who continuously catch our eye seem to have mastered the art of mixing vintage and secondhand pieces with current high street and designer labels. Each day this week, we’ll ask one of them to share her tips and tricks—from where to find the best Thai silk fisherman pants to how to avoid looking like a period actor. Today, Arden Wohl, the New York–based designer and filmmaker, shares her love of dresses and loud prints.
 
What are your favorite vintage stores or flea markets?
Of course Resurrection Vintage in Nolita and Southpaw Vintage in Midtown. I also love the Manhattan Vintage Clothing Show held at the Metropolitan Pavilion every year. My friend Rachel Zabar always has a fantastic stand there and I once bought an amazing Todd Oldham dress from his first collection!
 
What’s your favorite vintage find?
A polka dot Marimekko dress I bought at Sasparilla Vintage in Miami.
 
Do you have any strategies when it comes to vintage shopping?
I look for color and anything vintage Moschino! For me, it’s all about print.
 
Do you collect anything?
I am always looking for dresses--that is my main goal when vintage shopping. There’s so much energy in a dress. I love imagining where it’s been worn, who’s worn it, and what kind of person they were.
 
How do you avoid looking like you’re wearing a costume?
I always look costume-y and I think that’s fashion. I believe that I wear the dress and find the dress that I can overpower rather than the other way around.
 
What label or era are you constantly hunting for?
I am a seventies and eighties and early nineties girl. I do also love a lot of earlier stuff but I find that they tend to be very delicate and hard to wear. I do love Geminola and all of the amazing older fabrics that Lorraine Kirke works with there.
 
What are you willing to splurge on?
Moschino, Jean Paul Gaultier, Ossie Clark, and Vivienne Westwood!
 
What’s on your current vintage wish list?
A wild, long Halston disco gown from the seventies!

 


 

Langley Fox Hemingway Shares Tips from Los Angeles

There’s no shortage of well-dressed women in the world, but the ones who continuously catch our eye seem to have mastered the art of mixing vintage and secondhand pieces with current high street and designer labels. Each day this week, we’ll ask one of them to share their tips and tricks—from where to find the best Thai silk fisherman pants to how to avoid looking like a period actor. Today, Langley Fox Hemingway, the Los Angeles–based model and illustrator, talks the California flea market scene, Indiana Jones hats, and non-judgmental shopping.
 
What are your favorite vintage stores or flea markets?
I like the flea market on Melrose and Fairfax in Hollywood that happens every Sunday. I also enjoy Squaresville and Cherry Pick in Los Feliz, the Painted Bird, and Ragg Mopp in Silverlake, and every once in a while, the Rose Bowl flea market that happens monthly (though that one can be overwhelming, so I really have to be in the mood to search!).
 
Do you have any strategies when it comes to vintage shopping?
I can’t really go into normal stores to shop. I like that everything is one of a kind and things are a little weird—it makes it more unique. You generally have to try on and know that most items will have some damage or need a little alteration.  
 
How did you first get into vintage?
I first got into it early in high school. I remember looking at older girls who bought vintage clothes and admiring them for their originality and way of combining things. I also have always been a big fan of old musicians and classic movie stars, which is now of course “vintage.”
 
What labels or eras are you constantly hunting for?
I don’t really look for brand names, just things I like that are cheap, such as dresses from the sixties and seventies, suede or leather jackets, brimmed hats, old T-shirts, leather boots or oxfords, any sort of original overall, or maybe just something really silly.  
 
Do you collect any vintage items?
I collect a lot of hats—I love hats!
 
What’s on your current wish list?
I think I could definitely use some more good T-shirts now that summer is rolling around and maybe a little classic briefcase for a purse (my last one broke!).
 
What advice or tips would you offer to a vintage shopping novice?
Go into a vintage store when you feel good, you’re in the mood to browse and try on, and know that no one will negatively judge what you pick out as long as you don’t judge it. Oh, and don’t be afraid to be silly!
 
What’s your favorite vintage find?
Currently my favorite vintage item that I own is my vintage Indiana Jones hat that I got for $6. I like to wear it almost every day, and I decorated it with my grandfather’s pilot pins so it’s extra sentimental.

 


 

Marina Muñoz Shares Tips from Buenos Aires

There’s no shortage of well-dressed women in the world, but the ones who continuously catch our eye seem to have mastered the art of mixing vintage and secondhand pieces with current high street and designer labels. Each day this week, we’ll ask one of them to share her tips and tricks—from where to find the best Thai silk fisherman pants to how to avoid looking like a period actor. Today, Marina Muñoz, the Williamsburg-based stylist, talks estate jewelry, Etsy finds, and French chore coats made with indigo twill.
 
What are your favorite vintage stores or flea markets?
San Telmo in Buenos Aires is home to my favorite store in the world—Gil Antigüedades! There is also a weekly Sunday market there and it’s fantastic. It’s where you go to buy old crochet shirts and blouses. Plus, you can sit at a cafe and watch the tango dancers or catch a Murga street performance. Of course New York has countless wonderful places. I live in Williamsburg and love visiting About Glamour, Malin Landaeus, and 10 Ft. Single by Stella Dallas.

Are there any treasures you can find more easily in Buenos Aires?
My great-grandparents managed Harrods Buenos Aires, and before the Great Depression happened, a lot of famous brands from Paris and London were imported—Dior, Chanel. That is what you find now in the vintage stores and estate auctions. It’s a fantastic area to purchase pieces from the thirties and forties—all that’s left from the glory days.

Is the approach to vintage shopping different in Argentina?
As a whole I think we respect our past. Argentine women tend to wear pieces from their mother or grandmother. They have extremely chic, very European, and rather feminine taste. My style is certainly influenced by my roots—especially by my great-grandparents on either side of my father who were involved in fashion. And I am also inspired by gauchos, the farm, the tango scene, the art scene . . . all things Argentine and nostalgic!
 
What’s your favorite vintage find?
I don’t know if this counts, as it was a gift, but I would have to say my engagement ring from Doyle & Doyle, a store in Manhattan that sells estate jewelry. My husband picked it out with a dear friend—it’s from the thirties, a gorgeous diamond with two baguettes on either side.
 
Do you have any strategies when it comes to vintage shopping?
I don’t really care about labels, just fabric, make, and condition. I have to really fall in love (I have had a long love affair with vintage).
 
How did you first get into vintage?
I got really into vintage at age 19 when I moved to Buenos Aires. I began assisting a stylist there who was an avid vintage shopper and I learned a lot through her. She bought pieces and then brought them to New York to show designers or used them for her consulting projects. I was pretty much head-to-toe vintage then—very costume-y—with red lips and long hair. My bohemian life in Argentina consisted of horseback riding on the weekends, painting, reading Marguerite Duras novels, and planning dinner parties.  
 
How do you avoid looking like you’re wearing a costume?
I like mixing vintage with newer pieces, giving something life again. I am definitely careful to use vintage pieces over a more minimal look—it’s usually a one-statement vintage piece paired with a blouse, or a silk jumpsuit.
 
What are some of the labels or eras are you constantly searching for?  
Like I said before, I don’t really look at labels—unless it’s Hermès, Yves Saint Laurent, or old Dior! I do love older Dries Van Noten pieces but that’s not considered vintage. Currently I’m on the hunt for a matador jacket, preferably in black, red, or pink. I also collect chore coats from France (in indigo twill) or Asia. I love them and every time I stumble across one in a market or store, I simply have to purchase it.
 
What are you willing to splurge on?  
Alaïa!
 
What’s the best steal you’ve ever scored?
Believe it or not, it was on Etsy. I bought Gucci horsebit loafers for $30. They are pony hair and I love them.

 


 

Vintage Shopping with Rapper Misfit Dior

Here is what Laeticia Harrison-Roberts, aka Misfit Dior, is wearing for an afternoon of shopping at the Manhattan Vintage clothing show: an exquisite black-and-red-plaid swing coat and matching small-waisted sheath, a combo halfway between Betty Grable and Bettie Page; a narrow fake snake belt from Primark; Zara pumps; a red Givenchy purse, and a tiny hat perched on her undulating blonde Tippi Hedren–esque coiffure. It’s all period-perfect, until you notice that her slender arms are half-covered with expressionist tats, as if Marc Chagall had devoted himself to inky buxom viragos.
 
“My mom sewed this outfit in two days, she bought the fabric for a pound a yard at a market in East London! I usually wear pink, but she couldn’t find any pink on such short notice,” laughs Harrison-Roberts, whose mother makes virtually all her clothes from sketches her 29-year-old daughter, a rapper with fashion aspirations (more on this in a moment) provides. But there are things that mum, skilled seamstress that she is, just can’t whip up—vintage furs say, or structured handbags, or the funny little hats Harrison-Roberts loves. We are in search of all three, and whatever else catches her eyes, hidden today behind red Dior shades with purple stems.
 
At the very first booth, just inside the door, a strand of chubby pearls captures her imagination; less than a minute later, a framed handbag shaped like a little suitcase finds favor. “It’s almost like a laptop carrier, it’s the right size,” Harrison-Roberts observes, though in fact that invention is more than a half-century in the future.
 
But of course, it’s the ability to time travel, at least when it comes to clothes, that makes clothing shows like this so compelling. (The next edition is January 17 and 18.) While other shoppers are melting over beaded flapper frocks and Victorian lingerie, Dior is in love with mid-century fashion modernism, trying on a succession of big-shouldered furs, pancake flat chapeau, and gently caressing exquisitely wrought garments like a navy New Look dress with lacy insets. “I love the buttons!” Harrison-Roberts sighs. “They made things so beautifully back then.”
 
When she spied a full-on fox coat from the eighties which actually sports a Dior label she nearly swoons, but the price—$3,500—is not what an up-and-coming recording artist has in mind, regardless of her love of all things Dior. (On this subject she is quite knowledgeable, discoursing on one of her idols, the perennially leopard-clad Dior muse Mitzah Bricard.) So it is with great excitement that she uncovers another, shorter fox coat, perhaps showing a few signs of a long happy life and with a far less impressive provenance, but nevertheless chic and supremely wearable for $240.
 
This sublime purchase is rapidly stuffed into a shopping bag, and we repair for a coffee so she can fill me in on her extraordinary story. Harrison-Roberts grew up in the English countryside, in Sussex, but by fifteen was hanging out in London clubs til all hours. “My parents would pick me up at four in the morning,” she says with a smile.
 
As soon as she could, Harrison-Roberts moved to London, where she worked as a model and was an admitted hard partier. She loved rap and, in that way that young girls have, managed to talk her way backstage when Eminem was in town (maybe her chainmail top, pasties, and baggie jeans helped her case.) She quickly became friendly with his entourage, forming an especially close bond with Proof, who would take on the role of hip-hop Higgins to her rapping Eliza Doolittle. “He would critique all my rhymes, he mentored me,” she remembers.
 
On New Year’s Eve 2003, Harrison-Roberts arrived in the U.S., where she found an apartment in Williamsburg (where else?), worked the door at various clubs, attended open mics in Harlem, appeared on VH1’s Ego Trip’s (White) Rapper Show—“I left after two episodes; it was patronizing for me, but I got a lot of exposure”—and not accidentally, watched a lot of Hitchcock movies, perfecting her personal style.
 
Though she is currently completing her first album—the premiere track of which is entitled, tellingly, “Hitchcock Blonde,” she confesses, “I love fashion! Fashion actually came before music for me.” Visions of boxy purses and tiny hats and full-skirted frocks dancing in her head, she lowers her glance, gives the slightest toss to her pale waves, and admits,  “I want to get one album out and then—I really, really want my own clothing line!”

 


 

Tennessee Thomas Shares Tips from London

There’s no shortage of well-dressed women in the world, but the ones who continuously catch our eye seem to have mastered the art of mixing vintage and secondhand pieces with current high street and designer labels. Each day this week, we’re asking one of them to share her tips and tricks—from where to find the best Thai silk fisherman pants to how to avoid looking like a period actor. Today, Tennessee Thomas, the London expat and DJ, talks sixties dolly-bird style, Portobello Road, and trusting your gut.

What are your favorite vintage stores or markets?
I love Portobello Road, and Camden Passage in Angel, Islington has a market and lots of sweet vintage shops. I’ve found Mary Quant shirts there, as well as a very cool psychedelic 60s Hawaiian minidress and solid gold boots at a market stand.

What’s the best steal you’ve ever found?
A Paraphernalia dress worn by Edie Sedgwick, which I discovered at an antique shop on Portobello Road.

Are there any treasures you look for specifically when you’re in London?
I’m always looking for sixties dolly-bird gear—labels like Granny Takes a Trip, Biba, Relik, and Mary Quant. But it’s getting harder and harder to find. Every time I go back to visit my grandparents, I make a point to traipse Portobello market and explore the side streets of Soho, searching for a long-gone Carnaby Street full of mods and dollies! The Kinks! Or wandering down King’s Road in search of Johnny Rotten or the Marianne Faithfull Chelsea set in those now closed vintage havens. What can we do to preserve our heritage before every city in the world turns into the same high street of chain operations?!

Do you have any strategies when it comes to vintage shopping?
Buy things you like, regardless of trends or what is "in style.”

How do you avoid looking like you’re wearing a costume?
Mix pieces from different eras. Although I admire people who commit fully to one era—I think costume-y is really cool!

What era or labels are you constantly hunting for?
Sixties dolly-bird style, anything from Biba, Paraphernalia, Mary Quant, John Bates, etc.

Do you collect any vintage items?
I collect sixties activism badges.

What advice or tips would you offer to a vintage shopping novice?
Trust your gut! If it seems crazy, definitely go for it.

 


 

Vanessa Seward Shares Tips from Paris

There’s no shortage of well-dressed women in the world, but the ones who continuously catch our eye seem to have mastered the art of mixing vintage and second-hand pieces with current high street and designer labels. Each day this week, we’ll ask one of them to share their tips and tricks—from where to find the best Thai silk fisherman pants to how to avoid looking like a period actor. Today, Vanessa Seward, who lends her designing hand to the French label A.P.C., talks shopping in Paris, the seventies silhouette, and Chinese dinner jackets.
 
What are your favorite vintage stores or flea markets?
One of my favorite shops in Paris is La Jolie Garde-Robe (15 Rue Commines). Marie, the owner has excellent taste and a great selection of seventies French ready-to-wear from Rodier to Chanel. Ragtime (23 Rue de l’Echaudé) has a fantastic selection of couture and ready to wear, I’ve found some beautiful evening gowns from the thirties.

How did you first get into vintage?
I think it came from my teenage years when I mixed my mother’s couture pieces with my clothes. I always liked the fact that no one could copy my look too easily.

How do you avoid looking like you’re wearing a costume?
I suppose it’s all about the balance between vintage and non-vintage in one’s outfit. The more extravagant or distinguishable the piece, the more important it is to mix it with very modern and easy pieces. (A.P.C. is perfect for this!)

What are label or era are you constantly hunting for?
I love the thirties but unfortunately the pieces are usually very damaged, so I guess my favorite era would be the seventies (I’ve got the right silhouette) and right now I’m into labels like Ted Lapidus or Kenzo.

What are you willing to splurge on?
When I find a piece that fits me perfectly and I know I’ll wear right away, I don’t hesitate. When I have a doubt, I usually wait a week and leave it up to destiny.

What’s your favorite vintage find?
I have many but right now I’m really into my grandmother’s forties Chinese dinner jackets—she had a small collection and I own several of them.

What’s the best steal you’ve ever scored?
I found great pieces once at a garage sale on Rue Tronchet (a very chic street in the 8th Arrondissement in Paris). I purchased a Burberry trench, a Céline suede coat and a few great Yves Saint Laurent blouses at a very reasonable price; I wear them all often.

What’s on your current wish list?
I’d love to have a jeweled Piaget watch from the seventies.

What advice or tips would you offer to a vintage shopping novice?
Always check to make sure the piece is not too damaged—and smell it!

 

Series from vogue.com. All text by Ally Betker - except for Misfit Dior, text by Lynn Yaeger.

You May Also Like

Real Time Web Analytics